Posts Tagged ‘diet for autism’

Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs – Fall 2016

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

This week, the Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs held its semiannual conference in downtown Atlanta, GA. This is ‘Ground 0’ for practitioners, researchers and professors from all over the world to meet, learn, explore and discuss a myriad of relevant topics.

Members who have been returning for 100’s of lecture hours generally choose the advanced courses. For some, the conference has become a group of ~50 experienced and knowledgeable practitioners who meet to discuss ‘workups’, basic science, relevant research and treatment protocols for those who are most affected with ASD.

Notes and Observations
Day 1 – Tough Cases
I really enjoyed our lectures by the plain-speaking Dr. John Green, of Portland, OR. Dr. Green not only reviewed those who improved because of his medical expertise, but those who got better in spite of him, those who haven’t gotten better, those who got better but he can’t figure out why, and the most frustrating – patients who improve only to suffer frequent relapses.

Dr. Sid Baker, a pioneer of the biomedical movement, described his early medical experiences in Africa that morphed into his lifelong dedication to treating patients with ASD. He expressed his disappointment that so many conventional colleagues disagree with our practice.

Dr. Baker elucidated how he initiates care with new patients. He discussed increasingly resistant cases, covering topics from severe speech apraxia to the approach to children with injurious behaviors.

The first day was filled with the most frustrating and difficult cases you can imagine. Eminent practitioners Drs. James Neuenshwander, Michael Elice, and Julie Buckley challenged our diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge, attempting to navigate the complicated courses of those who improved and those who didn’t.

Day 2
Dr. Daniel Amen‘s morning lecture was entitled “3D Brain SPECT Imaging”. The takeaway message was that SPECT scans – technology – could/should/will become a mainstay for a multitude of CNS disorders. His manner and stories of research, technical evaluation, and clinical practice, were positively spellbinding and inspirational.

Dr. Theoharides presented his research and extensive knowledge about the important role of allergy in ASD. Dr. Theo continues to publish a mountain of monumental works, not only on the topics of autism and the role of mast cells, but treatments, as well.

Toxins were the subject of the afternoon’s lectures. We learned about the identification of substances in the environment that are dangerous, how they are measured, how damage is done, and the means to control and treat. For the skeptical reader, there was a plethora of supporting scientific evidence of the relationships to autism (and many other modern conditions).

As has become customary, Dr. Dan Rossignol rounded up the day with a roundup of all of the latest scientific research. Rapidly.

Day 3 – Advanced Clinical Cases
Severe behaviors and speech apraxia. For patients who are most resistant to conventional and alternative treatments, essential oils, acupuncture, and even worms were explored as possible solutions.

Throughout the afternoon, cases got even tougher! Lyme, Persistent Lyme, Non-Lyme Lyme, PANDAS, PANS, parasites… an increasing number of reasons to have signs and symptoms that are called autism. Such information extends our knowledge and leads to better diagnoses for our patients, and possibilities for treatment.

Dr. Green discussed biomarkers. Though these ‘labs’ are not specific to ASD, per se, this will become a necessary next step to document level of involvement and response to treatments.

A brand new treatment, repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation was presented by Dr. Arun Mukherjee. The jury is still out on this expensive intervention.

Conclusions
One important reason that I return to this meeting, is simply that I feel at home among like-thinking practitioners. Members don’t agree on every subject, but we are respectful and actually enjoy our practices.

In traditional medicine, conferences are basically show-and-tell affairs, where researchers report their data, previously published in medical journals. When doctors think outside the box, practitioners with diverse skills, who are scattered over the globe, discover improved results by networking in this fashion.

Patients, parents, and families can feel confident that progress is being made (slowly), as serious, dedicated doctors continue to try to unravel this modern mystery.

Finally, I am proud to report that, at this meeting, I was awarded Fellowship status in the Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs.

Scripting and Autism

Sunday, July 31st, 2016

lettersFrequently accompanying the emergence of language in children with speech apraxia, are parental concerns that easy questions are only repeated back, or that the child merely recites phrases from videos, etc. They wonder, “How can we fix this?” Well, maybe, it doesn’t need to be fixed.

Definition(s)
It is interesting to note that, one meaning of the word, as it relates to autism, is as a treatmentScripting involves presenting learners with a verbal and/or written description about a specific skill or situation that serves as a model for the learner.”

An end-of-the-century research paper described scripting as, “…high rates of delayed echolalia.” A previously desired goal has been the extinction of that form of language, in order to help the patient appear more ‘normal’.

Described by one speech pathologist is the more commonly accepted definition, “Reciting lines from movies, commercials, books, etc. is a common occurrence… Some experts predict it is a coping mechanism that is used during high stress periods, hence, a form of ‘stimming’.”

Amythest Shaber (“Ask an Autistic”) presents her insightful point of view, by describing two types, echolalial and social scripting. The former is referred to as “TV talk”, while the latter represents language that the individual entrains to express their thoughts about an emotional or complicated situation. Both are forms of communication or opportunities for potential socialization.

Cause(s)
Children are exposed to constant prompting and repetition by therapists, teachers and family. It’s natural. This is one reason that siblings are often so helpful, because they seem to be the ones who best understand their brother or sister, without demanding or correcting.

There is frequent exposure to digital media. Often, an affected child may view just one section of a video over and over. Without constraints on the volume or frequency of viewing time, how can they not have these songs or scenes playing in their head?

You won’t see a 28 month old scripting. Children acquiring language in their second year are not able to observe and recall details like an intelligent 4 year-old. The timing of language acquisition is altered and so the patterns are transformed.

It is the manifestation of limited expressive language. If an individual has only 1/3 of the possibilities for output, repeating a phrase 3 times makes up the difference, regardless of the meaning.

Discussion
In Life, Animated, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Ron Suskind, chronicled his success in reaching his son by encouraging this form of communication.

Likewise, the Son-Rise program advises ‘joining’ your child when they display repetitive scripting behaviors, so that they may be more likely to let the parent into their world.

Parents wish to understand whether such a strategy can be generalized to the ‘real world’? At The Child Development Center, we counsel that this is a good start to useful communication, leading to more coherent speech.

Conclusion(s)
Viewed through the lens of a patient who is recovering from ASD with verbal apraxia, scripting (frequently accompanied by echolalia) represents an expected developmental phase.

Taken one step further, communication reduces frustration and inspires confidence. This encourages more contact with the outside world, and maturity. Parents can then believe in their child’s abilities to enjoy a wider variety of experiences.

When scripting is considered in this light, other new strategies, and successful present ones, should be formalized and tested, in order to help the next generation of patients with ASD to achieve their highest potential.

July 4th with Developmentally Challenged Children

Friday, July 1st, 2016

July4While the rest of the country eagerly awaits an exciting and fun-filled day, there are some families who will wonder how to get through the celebration. Here are the top 10 reasons why this can be so challenging.

July4 littleThe trip to see the fireworks may present the first hurdle. The closer the venue is to home, the better. There will be less echolalia, as in “Get there?Get there?” And, if you need to return early, it’s a shorter journey.

July4 little otherProblems at The Beach, The Lake, The Mountain, etc. Dangers abound. Children with sensory issues do not necessarily perceive the experience as pleasurable; and families may be hard pressed to convince a reluctant child otherwise.

July4 littleSleep. Even if you can somehow avoid the hoopla, the neighborhood is awash in sights and sounds that can keep everybody going well into the night.

July4 little otherDangerous smoke bombs, sparklers, and other explosive devices. Parents need to remain constantly vigilant, lest their affected child jumps in to join in the ‘fun’.

July4 littleCrowds. Relatives, friends, neighbors, and strangers are present in sometimes overwhelming numbers. Then, there are pets, clowns, and other terrifying distractions.

July4 little otherParades. Waiting in line and jockeying to improve visibility of revelry that the children may not understand – or even look at – sometimes seems pointless and counterproductive.

July4 littleThe heat, mosquitoes, and outdoor environment can create more than the expected amount of whining, complaints, and rashes.

July4 little otherOff schedule activities. Often, children get used to any type of routine – even in the summertime. This becomes another day to explain why “We can’t do… this or that.”

July4 littleThe food. Many parents have to choose between enforcing a restricted diet, or letting a child ‘cheat’, perhaps leading to aggressive behaviors in the ensuing hours and days.

July4 little otherThe Fireworks! Really loud noises and flashing lights that may terrify even neurotypical youngsters. Not fun for all.

Our national holiday is supposed to be a joyous family affair, and is often remembered fondly. Parents hope to pass the experience on to the next generation. In certain circumstances, the atypical child presents novel tribulations – including more than a few that couldn’t have even been imagined.

Notes from the Autism Education Summit

Sunday, September 27th, 2015
theo and me

September 26, 2015 Dr. Theoharides and me

In the beginning of the autism epidemic, conferences included practitioners and families interested in assisting patients in their journey toward recovery. As the information has become more extensive and complicated, the needs and expectations of various parties have spawned more specific meetings.

Tufts University professor, eminent autism researcher and program sponsor, Dr. T C Theoharides, invited me to lecture at this year’s Generation Rescue conference in Dallas. It was a chance to speak to, and with, a worldwide audience of over 700 parents whose children had an ASD diagnosis.

An Alternative Biomedical Approach to Autism Spectrum
A group of ~ 50 ‘newbies’ attended. The topic was chosen because I wished to simplify the issues and offer hope that, despite what the conventional doctors have declared, recovery is possible.

The take home messages were:
1. Traditional medicine only offers bandaids for very complicated signs and symptoms. When the only tool that a person has at hand is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. The usual medications are very powerful with lots of side effects, and provide little in the way of genuine relief.

2. There is more than one way to skin a cat. Many of the other ‘DAN’ practitioners seem to utilize more complicated and expensive protocols, not necessarily superior to the approach that I find most successful. A basic workup was offered to identify laboratory variances indicating less-than-optimal health. Addressing those areas and improving energy with techniques that are not difficult to understand or institute, usually leads to significant progress.

3. Ultimately, autism really IS ‘rocket science’. There are multiple causes and a variety of presentations that even experienced practitioners are hard-pressed to understand and treat. By understanding the basics, parents can lead a team of professionals to get their affected offspring on the right track towards an optimal outcome.

Other Lectures
For 3 days, there was a full roster of presentations covering cause, effects and treatments. In addition to Dr. Theoharides, world-renowned researchers and practitioners, such as Drs. Dan Rossignol, Richard Frye, Jerry Kartzinel, and Anju Usman, gave their learned and extensive points-of-view about ASD.

It is my belief that sometimes the lectures were too demanding. Although the audience was quite intelligent and knowledgable, they seemed to expect more in the way of treatment options for their child, than basic science.

Jenny Group

Ryan Blair, Jenny, Jodi Gomes, Ryan&Dawn Neufeld, Jacqueline&Chris Laurita

Jenny McCarthy
Cue the music, lights, cameras, video screens and action! To this crowd, the lady is a rock-star. She definitely delivered a great message, filled with personal anecdotes, humor, empathy and hope. A panel discussion followed, consisting of famous, and not-so-famous, warrior moms and dads. This was certainly one of the conference highlights.

Conclusion
When I announced on Facebook that I was attending this conference, one of my ‘followers’ wrote, “I think I’m going to unlike this page now,” presumably because of the ‘misguided’ position of Generation Rescue regarding the issue of vaccine injury.  Talk about the polarized world of autism diagnosis and treatment.

Bottom line – I would definitely recommend this yearly conference to parents who have the time and resources.

Toilet Training and Autism

Sunday, June 14th, 2015

iPotty. Available @Amazon.com ~$30

Every parent faces the chore of imparting proper potty skills. Then, there is toilet training toddlers affected with autism.

I was recently interviewed about the special challenges that face parents as their affected offspring embark upon this important developmental milestone. Here are the questions and answers:

What challenges do children with autism have, either mental, social, or physical that would make learning a skill like potty training difficult?

Many children who are affected with autism have other medical conditions – known as comorbidities – that affect their health, especially in the gastro-intestinal tract. Poor G-I function can lead to diarrhea, constipation, GERD, and inflammation. Sometimes it can occur following the overuse of PPIs, antibiotics, or Miralax™.

Multiple sensory issues, accompanied by increased pain tolerance (or decreased perception) need to mature, so that traditional techniques are more likely to be successful.

Decreased energy production leading to decreased abdominal and rectal muscular function presents physical challenges for affected patients.

As these issues are successfully addressed, parents see improved toileting abilities.

Toilet Electric

Patent US 4162490 A 1978 Fang-Cheng Fu, Chien-Hung Fu A battery-powered toilet training device… to provide improved training of toddlers… A non-contact electronic sensor is used to detect the presence of urine and stool in the receptacle. A battery-powered toy is used to produce an audible signal and a mechanical motion to reward the toddler and to signal the trainer when the toddler’s elimination begins.

What effect does parental support or having a parent who is educated on autism have on the development of a child with autism?

Understanding that schedules are important to many children with ASD can be a key feature for achieving success. I usually ask parents to try to put the child on the potty one or two more times than the number of stools per day. That way, the child has more chance for success. Some schools will take children frequently.

Knowledgeable parents pay attention to the signs that the child wants to/ needs to/ is going to… “do number 2”. Sometimes, they are lucky, and catch it early enough. Literally.

Assistance is provided by achieving G-I health with non-inflammatory, non-processed, lower sugar, better digested foods.

There are even special sensory challenges, such as the noise from a bathroom hand dryer, that make facilitating acceptable auditory functioning paramount for success in that venue.

Have you ever had parents come to you needing support or information in the area of potty training?

This is a common problem that becomes increasingly noticeable as children enter preschool years. General-education staff are usually resistant to students who have not acquired this skill. There are lots of websites, but most parents have explored that route.

Behavioral, occupational, physical and neurodevelopment interventions by professionals can be quite helpful, especially when referred by previous successful families.

Do you have any research or stats on the relationship of potty training and autism, or on the topic of potty training as it pertains to autism?

The earliest work on this actually appeared when Dr. Leo Kanner first described Autistic Disturbances of Affective Contact 75 years ago. A majority of the children displayed gastrointestinal signs and symptoms that were overlooked at the time (by the father of modern child psychiatry).

Another unfortunate reality is that, medical evaluation has been slowed by the inclusion of all ‘retarded’ children in many of the early studies about this problem. A 1970’s article entitled, Toilet Training of Normal and Retarded Children, appeared in the Journal of Applied Behavioral Analysis.

In the 90’s, Additive Benefits of Laxative, Toilet Training, and Biofeedback Therapies in the Treatment of Pediatric Encopresis represented the state of the art. Comorbidities were not recorded, and autism was not an outcome measure.

At last, in this century, research documenting ‘normal‘ acquisition of bathroom skills appeared in a respected pediatric journal. A review entitled, Toilet training individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities concluded, “Shortcomings to currently available programs are highlighted and future areas of study are suggested.”

A ‘model for treatment‘ has been offered in a respected research journal. It was based on two patients.

There is plenty of room for improvement in our understanding and treatment of this difficult problem.

When Professionals Disagree about Autism

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

Parents strive to do their best for all their children, and this is especially challenging for those with special needs. So, families seek assistance from assorted channels; including books, other parents, therapists, teachers, professional practitioners, and of course, the Internet.

Inevitably, discussions arise about the ‘best way’ to handle specific situations, including the core domain difficulties of social isolation, repetitive motions (‘stims’) and communication.

Due to the enigmatic combination of signs and symptoms that presently fall under an Autism Spectrum diagnosis, there are usually more opinions than the number of authorities involved.

Conflicting information emanates from various sources:
Often, child neurologists are negative about practitioners who offer alternative medical interventions. There has been little change in the advice that they have offered for the past 25 years. Their information is based upon children who were previously put into mental institutions with other ‘retarded’ individuals.
What is the parent of a 5-year-old with apraxia to do? “Get more therapy!” Really? That’s all you’ve got, doc?

Likewise, pediatricians are generally clueless regarding ASD. Whenever a professional concludes, “We should wait for 6 months or so, to give a diagnosis,” parents should seek more substantial advice. What other medical condition is assigned this situation? Certainly not ear, throat or sinus problems, which appear to require immediate antibiotic intervention, regardless of a fever or other confirmatory signs.

Specialists, such as gastroenterologists, allergists, immunologists, pulmonologists and dermatologists seem to have tunnel vision, when it comes to autism. ‘Constipation’ and ‘eczema’ are descriptive terms, not astute diagnoses. Steroids are short-lived band-aids. Miralax® and Prilosec® are downright dangerous.

Psychiatrists, developmental pediatricians, and psychologists are considered experts in assigning an accurate diagnosis. However, RisperdalAbilify, and Adderall never made any child speak. Plus, there are a multitude of negative side effects.

Speech and Language Therapists are the authorities who have been on the front line of the autism epidemic. Children who do not speak are apraxic – period! Advice, such as, “He doesn’t want to speak,” is meaningless. “Mommy, I want juice,” is easier than dragging a parent to the refrigerator. The child would say it, if the circuits worked correctly.

Occupational and physical therapists should be a mainstay, until fine motor skills become age-appropriate. If there were a supplement or medication for such abilities, we would all take a pill and get piano lessons. In the meantime, it takes practice, practice, practice. Children who avoid handwriting lessons are not ‘easily distracted’; they simply don’t wish to ‘suck’ in another activity that other kids tolerate or even enjoy.

Behavioral therapists who claim that a young child is too disruptive and requires medication should seek other employment. Similarly, assigning blame to the family for inconsistent or incorrect responses is not helpful. The more challenging the behavior, the more that a professional should seek the cause and treatments.

The Internet is a collection of stories, with little supporting information. Parents should seek sites that use hyperlinks to actual studies and avoid those with quick fixes or magic remedies. If it worked, we would know about it.

Other families are helpful, for sure. However, their experience is limited to the number of children, their ages, and their condition. No matter how well-meaning, the information needs to be taken with a great deal of salt.

The solution to all of these various expert opinions, is aided by an experienced medical practitioner who has cared for many patients and listens. By taking into account the history, physical, laboratory findings, and previous treatment regimes, a framework for real progress can be constructed.

‘Tis the Season to be Yeasty

Sunday, November 30th, 2014

seasongreat“Why does the yeast keep coming back? When will we be able to stop worrying about that?” Those are oft-repeated concerns from many parents of patients with ASD, who have noted remarkable improvements when their offspring no longer suffer from fungus.

At certain times of the year, more ASD patients seem to appear who display signs and symptoms of gut yeast. This list explains some underlying causes for this phenomenon. It can be sung to the tune of the Christmas Song or Dreidel Dreidel Dreidel.

Families travel. It is unlikely that they will come upon a road sign advertising “GF/CF/SF/SCD Fried Chicken”.

Likewise, running out of magic medications or significant supplements may lead to an increased chance of a yeast outbreak.

There are relatives who do not believe that food affects behaviors. Some try to sneak forbidden substances, just to prove that ‘The Diet’ is unnecessary. By the following day, there are often many new believers.

Traditional seasonal foods are usually not part of a restricted diet. In an effort to make the situation more ‘normal’, unfamiliar foods are provided that may lead to constipation or diarrhea.

Refined sugar and high fructose corn syrup are ubiquitous in processed foods. Yummy desserts can yield yucky, yeast-disturbed sleep.

Changes in weather often accompany a higher risk of viral and bacterial illness. Fevers and ‘colds’ frequently lead to antibiotic overuse that may result in yeast overgrowth.

“You’ve got to let them be kids,” said one parent who relented about the key lime pie. Another one lamented, “I paid for that ice cream cone – for a week!”

School personnel get relaxed about the diet in susceptible kids. Daily celebrations make the forbidden fruit even more appealing.

Junior has lots of new stuff (toys, packages, etc.) to put into his mouth. This provides an opportunity for a multitude of strange flora to explore your child.

Environmental alterations take place; such as a Christmas tree, ornaments pulled from the top shelves, and warm clothing exhumed from rarely-visited closets. This provides plenty of moldy allergens to over-tax the immune system.

Schools, homes, churches, etc. turn on the heating system for the first time; expelling blasts of spores. This may occur in climates as diverse as warm, wet Florida, or the chilly nights in dry Arizona.

With autism, the extra social and academic challenges at this time of year are overwhelming. This can lead to anxiety, poor(er) eating, aggression and sleep disturbance – giving the appearance of ‘yeasty behaviors’, even if that is not the cause. Family problems can produce a similar picture.

What to do about it:
Parents should not despair about this situation. Yeast in the G-I system is one of the few causes of the signs and symptoms of autism that CAN be successfully treated with safe and effective supplements, diet and medication.

This is a great time to provide natural anti-fungals, such as vinegar, garlic, olive leaf, etc., to the extent that products are palatable and well tolerated.

Under the supervision of an experienced physician, a course of a prescription anti-fungal may be just what the doctor ordered as a holiday ‘chaser’ for ASD patients affected with yeast.

Why Don’t All Doctors Treat Autism This Way?

Sunday, October 12th, 2014

“If this protocol is so great, why doesn’t everyone know about it and do it?”

No answer seems to satisfy those who are firmly grounded in the old-time perceptions about ASD.  A patient’s (physician) family member raised this question recently, and it deserves a proper explanation.

The Top Reasons That Everyone Doesn’t Do It
(Combine a biomedical and traditional approach to reverse autistic signs and symptoms):

Time:
An accurate diagnosis is only produced by a thorough history and physical examination. “It’s autism,” is not good enough. A real medical ‘workup‘ helps determine the type of autism and co-morbidies. That is only the beginning. The most successful outcomes occur when families are involved to assist neuro-typical development.

Today’s physicians simply don’t have the luxury to spend hours per case; unless they are cutting, injecting, or physically assaulting the patient. Time, itself, is undervalued, and few practitioners choose this route.

Money:
Many of the resources that are most effective in reducing the conditions that are diagnosed as ASD are either not- or poorly- covered, by insurance. That applies to professionals, therapies, laboratory testing, supplements, and often even pharmaceutical products. The extra costs for each affected child are in excess of $ 40,000 per year, $ 1.4M per lifetime, and $ 2.4M per lifetime if there is intellectual disability.

Only recently have early diagnosis and intervention produced documented improvement, and biomedical interventions appear to be an unproven and unwarranted cost.

Big pharma is not involved:
Ah, the autism pill. News Flash: Like cancer, there won’t be one kind of ASD, or one successful treatment. However, there is research about many of the conditions that present with similar signs, including genetic and mitochondrial disorders. That work is putting doctors on the right path. As explained at a recent conference, it costs more than $1B to develop a new medication that makes it to patients. To date, 1/68 does not appear to represent an adequate market share.

Plus, many of the successful autism treatments involve supplements that are not expensive or controlled by the drug industry. Doctors are not served a tempting lunch provided by the makers of probiotics or other over-the-counter remedies.

The Wakefield Effect:
Due to controversial statements by a now-infamous British physician, the new reason that, “There are no studies to prove that theory,” is fear on the part of researchers. Really? Then, there are vaccination issues. Furthermore, not unlike previous epidemics, such as HIV-AIDS, there are a multitude of potions, and practitioners who promote them, to fill the medical void.

Parents may be willing travel to abroad or offer unusual treatments, seeking an unproven therapy. They are not crazy, they are desperate. The biomedical treatments that produce results are often lost in such clutter.

Denial:
“Selling” a newly-elucidated medical condition is a problem for family members who don’t think anything is amiss, except their version of proper parenting. Add a dash of medical jargon, and, for some, that is more difficult to swallow than reduced liquid glutathione.

Furthermore, those times when children suffer negative reactions due to die-off or methyl B12 stimulation may be easily misunderstood as regression or worsening of behaviors. Again, such events require a great deal of physician-patient interaction.

Poor Advertising:
The Child Development Center has offered services to many Florida universities, with very slow progress. Perhaps there is resistance due to NIH (Not Invented Here), or the specter of evil as regards the practice of holistic, complementary and alternative medicine. The Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs provides peer-reviewed research and education. TheAutismDoctor.com has a healthy readership, but obviously not enough to change popular opinion.

The gut-brain connection, metabolic problems, toxic exposure, and positive outcomes in ASD have been documented for decades. More publicity nowadays requires a book (working on that one), or a television show.

The Short Answer:
The present state-of-the-art in autism recovery is early recognition, an individualized protocol, and a complicated ongoing process of medical and therapeutic interventions.
It’s not a pill.

GcMAF Autism Treatment Update

Monday, August 25th, 2014

Earlier in this century, it was reported that 1) Some cancer patients demonstrated an elevated level of an enzyme, called nagalase, and 2) When patients have been given a purified blood product, GcMAF, which acts as sort of an antidote, there have been reports that treatments were successful in some medical conditions.

Because of elevated levels of nagalase in children with ASD, it was suggested that the same treatment could be helpful to address inflammation in autism, as well.

So, for the past couple of years, The Child Development Center has been treating a small number of patients with a protocol, slightly modified for this pediatric practice. The first blog, explaining the therapy, appears here. Six months ago, I reported on our initial experience.

My conclusions at that time were: improvements were generally seen in children older than 5 years, females appeared to respond better, some showed dramatic improvements in speech and cognition, and most parents were satisfied enough to re-order the product. In the past 6 months, there have been more patients and additional experience, particularly learning about lower dosing and altering dosage depending on signs and symptoms. Most recently, there is a new, ‘improved’ version of GcMAF to evaluate.

Side effects, while not severe, are variable, from slight rashes and fevers to increased aggression, especially in the first month. The product is well tolerated.

What is GcMAF? Macrophage Activating Factor is a purified human protein. It arrives as ~1/2 tsp of a clear liquid that requires immediate refrigeration. Macrophages are cells that play a role in cleanup, immunity, muscle regeneration, and wound healing. With such capabilities, it is not difficult to imagine that some types of autism could be addressed by boosting the activity, especially if there is interference from another substance (nagalase).

GOleic, the newest preparation, is GcMAF attached to a native oil. According to the manufacturer, “oleic acid is found naturally both in the human body and in olive oil; it is the first thing GcMAF looks for once it enters the body. In the laboratory it is many times more powerful than standard GcMAF…”.

The company representative stated that, “There is a reported increase in positive results to 25% from 15%.” This may not seem like much, but it represents improvement in a population that was previously stuck at a level of autism demonstrating very-little-to-no improvement for years.

Some of the claims made on the GcMAF.eu website require additional scrutiny. The only documented ASD experience, so far, is an anecdotal report on 2000+ patients, that asserts “15% have their autism eradicated.” That is not my observation. The implication of unknown viruses as a major cause of autism has not been borne out in conventional literature.

How much does it cost? The new preparation is now available in a sublingual form, which is preferable to the subcutaneous (injection) route, for most families. “GOleic’s price is €450  plus €60 shipping. It arrives in either a vial, (treat as GcMAF) or a dropper bottle…” Given once or twice a week, there are enough doses so parents can assess response and decide whether to re-order.

Conclusion:
Protocols that assess the immune system and nutritional integrity, plus optimize gastrointestinal function, have proven quite effective in the majority of younger patients. When continued treatment does not result in communication or behavioral abatement, parents seek more assistance. The conventional medical advice is to get even more therapy (often, not covered by insurance) or prescribe harmful medications, such as risperdal and prozac.

To date, GcMAF therapy is no panacea. However, treatment appears safe and has provided some advancements in cognition and communication, especially in patients who have not seen similar improvements in years.

The jury is still out. Experienced parents have been through the cycle of hope-hype-disappointment of previous clinical trials. Autism is a huge hurdle, and GcMAF represents a possible useful piece in the treatment puzzle.

The Effects of Soy on Patients with Autism?

Sunday, June 8th, 2014

The less known about a topic, the more the Internet will fill in the blanks, whether or not it represents the truth. So it goes with soy products, especially as regards patients with ASD.

On one hand, parents are advised that their child should avoid casein (a milk protein), but the closest dietary substitutes for yogurt, milk and cheese are typically soy based. On the other hand, there are numerous experts with opinions and stories that warn about a multitude of evils associated with this ubiquitous foodstuff.

? Estrogen Effect
Infants fed soy formula can achieve a significant level of estrogen-like hormones. Recent information links such components to reduced fertility, earlier puberty and disrupted prenatal and early development. There is a paucity of human research, however. Consequences in autistic children are yet-to-be-discovered, and soy components do have positive, anti-oxidant properties.

? Morphine Effect
The production of morphine compounds from inadequate digestion of wheat and dairy is a controversial topic. Nevertheless, at The Child Development Center, a GF/CF diet in children who test high in morphine metabolites is key in reducing the ‘fog’ that prevents normal socialization. Although less identifiable, high intake of soy can sometimes produce these same effects.

? Allergic Effect
The association of food allergies in patients with autism has been a consistent finding (A, B, C, D, E). Sometimes, there is a significant elevation of anti-soy antibodies of various types (IgG, IgE, and subtypes). As in any auto-immune state, avoidance of the offending agent results in better health and improved response to conventional therapies, such as OT, PT, S&L, and ABA

GMO Effect
The new G-I paradigm considers the environmental microbiome. This includes the organisms of – and not of – us, as they interact in the larger intestinal environment. Microorganisms affect neural, endocrine, lining and muscle cells, finally communicating with the rest of the body. It difficult to believe in this generally-accepted modern view and not consider any previous research into the safety of Genetically Modified Food practically irrelevant.

I recently discussed this issue with two of our mothers. One was raised on a farm, and personally witnessed the changes to the family crop as the plants became resistant to… anything. “They are no longer the same!” said that parent. Another mom asked, “In a sense, isn’t everything genetically modified?” But, inserting a new genetic code artificially is un-natural selection. The downstream effects are potentially disastrous, particularly if childhood development was not a previously considered outcome parameter.

It’s not just soy, however. Although a great majority of the US soy is from genetically modified seed, many other crops have been altered, as well.

Conclusions
This plant product is one of the most utilized protein sources in the world. It is a natural food source for many species, and has been a staple in the human population. Clinical studies have shown that eating soy can lower cholesterol as well as the risk for certain types of cancer. Theoretically, it should represent a healthy nutrient.

Our microbiome is constantly being artificially altered with antibiotics, steroids, and a multitude of even more toxic and/or unknown substances. It’s difficult to imagine that such modification couldn’t affect certain growing minds and bodies – in, or out of the womb. Many of the concerns about soy can be aimed at a multitude of foodstuffs – plant and animal.
So, what’s left?

Negative effects notwithstanding, this is sometimes the lesser-evil in patients who demonstrate multiple food allergies but test low for soy and leaky gut. Choices need to be made in order for children to achieve a positive nitrogen balance, which should result in healthier growth and more typical development. When possible, parents can look for rice, nut and other acceptable substitutes.

BIG DISCLAIMER*
At The Child Development Center, a very effective method of addressing the assault on the human microbiome has been the addition of appropriate, potent probiotics with particular strains that improve each individual’s homeostasis. Sometimes, anti-fungals are required. Rarely, even anti-viral medications can be helpful.

It is a process that involves identification of flora before, and often after, intimating appropriate in individualized therapy.

*The information is presented for discussion purposes only.
This is not personal medical advice and not intended for specific patients.

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Brian D. Udell MD
6974 Griffin Road
Davie
FL 33314
Office phone – 954-873-8413
Fax – 954-792-2424

Email bdumd@childdev.org
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